Patricia Kowal Acupuncture Noosa QLD

Frequently Asked Questions

Acupuncture FAQ

Chinese Herbal Medicine FAQ

Cupping Therapy FAQ

 

Acupuncture FAQ

How do I schedule an appointment?
Where does acupuncture come from?
What is the difference between Chinese and Japanese acupuncture?
What should I expect from receiving my first acupuncture treatment?
Can I still get acupuncture if I’m afraid of needles?
What do acupuncture needles look like?
Does acupuncture hurt?
How long do I have to go to acupuncture for?
Can I get acupuncture treatments if I’m under the care of my general physician?
Is there modern research on the effectiveness of acupuncture?
Do health funds cover the cost of acupuncture?
Do acupuncturists in Australia need to be registered or licensed?


How do I schedule an appointment?

To schedule an appointment for acupuncture and/or Chinese herbal medicine, contact me via phone, email, or use the online booking feature found on the contact page.

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Where does acupuncture come from?

Acupuncture is a therapy used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and is the oldest established medical system in the world. In China, TCM is considered to be one of the primary modalities in the treatment of various medical disorders from emotional imbalances to broken bones.

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What is the difference between Chinese and Japanese style acupuncture?

Chinese and Japanese acupuncture styles differ in the way the practitioner diagnoses and treats your condition. Typically, Traditional Chinese Medicine style acupuncture will diagnose via your pulse, tongue and reported symptoms. Japanese style acupuncture typically uses your pulse, abdominal and body palpation to best develop your treatment plan. Japanese style treatments are known to use a gentler approach to needling which is beneficial if you are sensitive or have a fear of needles.

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What should I expect from receiving my first acupuncture treatment?

Your first acupuncture visit consists of an initial one-hour interview and treatment, upon which a thorough medical history is taken. Ample time is allowed for you to explain your health concerns and goals. A report of findings regarding your health condition is discussed and a recommendation is made regarding the length and frequency of your treatment. The length of time needles stay in the body during a treatment varies depending on the condition of the patient. Herbal consultations are included in the initial interview if desired.

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Can I still get acupuncture if I’m afraid of needles?

Don’t shy away from acupuncture if you don’t like needles! You may choose alternative acupuncture and Chinese medicine therapies. If you are considering trying acupuncture but are afraid or sensitive to needling therapies, consult with me first to express your concerns and to discuss non-needle alternative treatment options. You will have the opportunity to see the needles and try a demonstration first if you desire. Some non-needle Chinese medicine therapies include moxibustion, cupping, gua-sha (scraping technique), tui-na (massage technique), and the use of magnets. Choosing different types of therapies gives me the ability to offer creative multi-directional treatment approaches for you.

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What do acupuncture needles look like?

Acupuncture needles are hair thin, solid, sterile, used once only and discarded. Approximately fifteen acupuncture needles can fit into a hollow hypodermic needle used for injections and giving blood. Acupuncture needles vary in size depending on the condition treated.

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Does acupuncture hurt?

Acupuncture needles are hair thin and are inserted shallowly into the skin. Generally if you have experienced getting a tattoo or blood work drawn from your arm, then you have most likely experienced more pain than with my style of acupuncture. Upon the first visit I will talk with you regarding your sensitivity to pain and adjust the treatment accordingly. Each patient experiences acupuncture treatments differently, some describe it as a slight pinch akin to a mosquito bite. Some find acupuncture treatments relaxing and may fall asleep.

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How long do I have to get acupuncture for?

Every body is different. If two people come in with a similar complaint, each will receive a different treatment plan and recommended frequency of visits. Generally, three treatment levels are used to determine the frequency and longevity of treatments: acute symptom relief, restorative care and continuing care. Know what to expect by these general stages of treatment:

Acute symptom level: an acute pain and/or another condition is interfering in your ability to function in your daily activities. The treatment plan: more frequent visits over the next few weeks or months. For example, a patient with acute back pain may have 1-2 visits each week for two to five weeks before moving to the restorative care level.

Restorative care level: acute symptoms are being addressed and treatments per week are less frequent. This level is about attempting to maintain the gains you have made and sets the foundation for a plan for to continue deeper healing.

Continuing care level: a longer-term support plan with less frequent visits, monthly or even seasonal for preventative maintenance. This aims at strengthening your body’s resistance to illness and keeping you going on your path to wellness.

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Can I get acupuncture treatments if I’m under the care of my general physician?

Yes, acupuncture and traditional Western medical treatments can be given in tandem with prescription and over the counter medicines. I can work as a team with any of your providers such as your general physician, physio or mental health counsellor. This creates a team approach to your healing and looks at health from all perspectives.

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Is there modern research on the effectiveness of acupuncture?

Modern scientific research is being conducted in regard to acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine. The 1997 National Institute of Health declared, “There is sufficient evidence of acupuncture's value to expand its use into conventional medicine and to encourage further studies of its physiology and clinical value." See my links page for a link to the Society on Acupuncture Research where you will find the most up to date research being conducted on acupuncture and Chinese medicine.

Acupuncture links and downloads

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Do private health care funds cover the cost of acupuncture?

You will need to check your private health fund carrier for covered acupuncture benefits. You may find your benefits under the title “complementary alternative” treatment in your health fund booklet. Acupuncture is on the rise with more private health find companies willing to reimburse for treatments. If acupuncture is not listed under one of your benefits, I recommend enquiring with your health fund providers about how to gain coverage.

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Do acupuncturists in Australia need to be registered or licensed?

Yes! Acupuncturists and Chinese herbal practitioners or any practitioner of Traditional Chinese Medicine need to be licensed by the Australian Health Practitioners Agency (AHPRA). AHPRA sets standards and policies that all acupuncturists must meet in order to practice Chinese Medicine. Check whether a practitioner is registered with AHPRA's Register of Practitioners.

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